Phospholipid Therapy Review

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NewRon
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Phospholipid Therapy Review

Postby NewRon » Fri Sep 17, 2021 1:50 pm

https://brain.forever-healthy.org/displ ... id+Therapy

This all sounds amazingly positive till you get towards the end;

[i][i]However, despite the widespread use of PLT over the last 50 years, data on the benefits in healthy individuals is extremely limited.

On the other hand, the major long-term risks, though largely still hypothetical, are serious. Recent publications on high dietary intake of phosphatidylcholine and its correlation with increased all-cause mortality, increased risk of lethal prostate cancer and increased risk of acute myocardial infarction warrant serious reflection on the safety of long-term supplementation with phosphatidylcholine-containing products. A possible explanatory mechanism for the damage caused by the consumption of high levels of choline-containing products has already been shown in a clinical study.

Based on the analysis of all currently available data, we find that short-term supplementation with phosphatidylcholine is a potential treatment option for cases of known liver disease, cognitive impairment, or in conjunction with NSAIDs.

Whether the benefits may also outweigh the risks in a generally healthy population is unknown. If one decides to supplement with phospholipids, risk mitigation measures such as measurement of TMAO and stool analysis should be performed regularly.

We recommend against the use of phosphatidylcholine supplementation in the case of known CVD until the situation regarding the PC-related production of TMAO and its role in CVD has been further clarified.




[/i][/i]
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Re: Phospholipid Therapy Review

Postby Blissful1 » Sun Sep 19, 2021 1:18 pm

I was just thinking to add back in phosphatidyl choline or serine and I saw this. I was off keto for about a year due to intestinal distress and just started back today. Are other 4/4's using this supplement and how are you finding it

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Re: Phospholipid Therapy Review

Postby NewRon » Sun Sep 19, 2021 2:29 pm

I have just received CDP Citicholine, so I'm in the same boat as you, Bliss!
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Re: Phospholipid Therapy Review

Postby Julie G » Mon Sep 20, 2021 8:01 am

However, despite the widespread use of PLT over the last 50 years, data on the benefits in healthy individuals is extremely limited.

On the other hand, the major long-term risks, though largely still hypothetical, are serious. Recent publications on high dietary intake of phosphatidylcholine and its correlation with increased all-cause mortality, increased risk of lethal prostate cancer and increased risk of acute myocardial infarction warrant serious reflection on the safety of long-term supplementation with phosphatidylcholine-containing products. A possible explanatory mechanism for the damage caused by the consumption of high levels of choline-containing products has already been shown in a clinical study.

Based on the analysis of all currently available data, we find that short-term supplementation with phosphatidylcholine is a potential treatment option for cases of known liver disease, cognitive impairment, or in conjunction with NSAIDs.

Whether the benefits may also outweigh the risks in a generally healthy population is unknown. If one decides to supplement with phospholipids, risk mitigation measures such as measurement of TMAO and stool analysis should be performed regularly.

We recommend against the use of phosphatidylcholine supplementation in the case of known CVD until the situation regarding the PC-related production of TMAO and its role in CVD has been further clarified.

Hi Ron! Thanks for sharing. This is decent info, but I'm not a fan of the lack of transparency with regard to whom it's coming from. I was able to track the team down, but wish they'd be more forthcoming with their identities, especially when sharing medical advice.

FWIW, given the importance of choline to brain health, we took a dive into choline as it relates to TMAO and prostrate cancer in The End of Alzheimer's Program and came to the following conclusions. (Our references are in the book.)

TMAO Some studies have suggested that eating red meat raises TMAO, which in turn increases the risk for heart disease, cancer, and all-cause mortality. However, the epidemiological evidence is inconsistent and virtually disappears when kidney disease and insulin resistance are considered as contributing factors. Additionally, none of these studies takes into account the health of the microbiome (where TMAO originates) and may underestimate the healthy user bias—the concept that those who eschew red meat may have overall healthier habits. We suspect that the small amount of unprocessed clean animal protein we recommend in the context of a heavily plant-based diet and healthy lifestyle will minimize the potential negative effect of TMAO.

Prostrate Cancer An inconsistent correlation has been found between egg consumption (choline intake) and prostate cancer that holds true only for North America. In countries where there is high egg consumption and plentiful vegetable intake, this correlation disappears. Newer research suggests that the unhealthy user bias traditionally associated with egg intake may be mediating this risk. We suspect that men who are otherwise following our heavily plant-based. no-sugar guidelines will minimize the potential risk. Men at higher risk due to progressive benign prostate enlargement or who are diagnosed with prostate cancer should be careful to meet but not exceed their choline needs.


We've essentially concluded that the potential warnings surrounding choline supplementation should be heeded in the context of an overall unhealthy diet/lifestyle. That said, this is a perfect place to practice personalized, precision. For instance, I've recently learned through the Prodrome Blood Scan that I have lower levels of peripheral phosphatidylcholine despite my dietary intake and supplementation with CDP Citicoline. Today was my first day of 2 tsp of sunflower lectin dissolved in water and I plan to work up to a full TBS. All of my vascular risk factors are extraordinarily low, but perhaps I should check TMAO levels as I progress to be uber-cautious?

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Re: Phospholipid Therapy Review

Postby NewRon » Wed Sep 22, 2021 3:40 am

Julie,

Thanks for the clarification, it's very interesting!

Apparently Brussles Sprouts appear to reduce TMAO and I also found this, much to my delight;

In fact, when DMB was added to their drinking water, they found TMAO levels and the formation of arterial plaques both declined. DMB may be found naturally in many Mediterranean diet foods, including red wine and extra virgin olive oil.

I've plenty of both to hand, luckily!
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Re: Phospholipid Therapy Review

Postby circular » Thu Sep 23, 2021 10:57 am

Julie G wrote:I've recently learned through the Prodrome Blood Scan that I have lower levels of peripheral phosphatidylcholine despite my dietary intake and supplementation with CDP Citicoline.

I haven't had time to follow the Prodrome material, and since it's so expensive, apparently without there being a realistic, affordable alternative, for me it's not much worth the time it would take to understand it. But one question I always have with any kind of biomarker testing is just how frequently the thing being tested fluctuates. How telling is one test of peripheral phosphatidylcholine? Peripheral levels may be quite constant, and along with all the other variables relating to methodology and the like being sound, the test may be highly accurate. I just hope that this has been studied in depth.
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Re: Phospholipid Therapy Review

Postby Julie G » Fri Sep 24, 2021 6:37 am

But one question I always have with any kind of biomarker testing is just how frequently the thing being tested fluctuates. How telling is one test of peripheral phosphatidylcholine? Peripheral levels may be quite constant, and along with all the other variables relating to methodology and the like being sound, the test may be highly accurate. I just hope that this has been studied in depth.

Great question, my friend. My guess, like any other biomarker, the Prodrome Scan is a snapshot of your current state of health at the moment the test was taken. That said, there are likely some markers that are more stable than others, but we are certainly at the forefront of attempting to understand and manipulate metabolomics.

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Re: Phospholipid Therapy Review

Postby NewRon » Mon Sep 27, 2021 1:51 pm

ConsumerLab have just updated their choline review;

https://www.consumerlab.com/reviews/cho ... w/choline/
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Re: Phospholipid Therapy Review

Postby circular » Tue Sep 28, 2021 3:22 pm

NewRon wrote:ConsumerLab have just updated their choline review;

https://www.consumerlab.com/reviews/cho ... w/choline/

Dang, I just let go of my subscription because the price had crept up over the years and I didn't use it often enough to justify it anymore. Perhaps they needed to raise it but :( I'm going to miss them at times like this.
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Re: Phospholipid Therapy Review

Postby Quantifier » Mon Oct 11, 2021 9:53 am

Julie G wrote:We've essentially concluded that the potential warnings surrounding choline supplementation should be heeded in the context of an overall unhealthy diet/lifestyle. That said, this is a perfect place to practice personalized, precision. For instance, I've recently learned through the Prodrome Blood Scan that I have lower levels of peripheral phosphatidylcholine despite my dietary intake and supplementation with CDP Citicoline. Today was my first day of 2 tsp of sunflower lectin dissolved in water and I plan to work up to a full TBS. All of my vascular risk factors are extraordinarily low, but perhaps I should check TMAO levels as I progress to be uber-cautious?


Hi Julie G, do you know of testing companies that test for TMAO?


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