Health, Cell Membranes and Phosphatidylcholine

Alzheimer's, cardiovascular, and other chronic diseases; biomarkers, lifestyle, supplements, drugs, and health care.
GenePoole0304
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Health, Cell Membranes and Phosphatidylcholine

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GenePoole0304
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Re: Health, Cell Membranes and Phosphatidylcholine

Post by GenePoole0304 »

additional info

http://shop.nutrasal.com/ProductDetails ... erebra_2OZ

just to bump this up on the forum... I'm researching this so any comments are welcome if anyone tried it or has an idea about it.
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Julie G
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Re: Health, Cell Membranes and Phosphatidylcholine

Post by Julie G »

I'm intrigued. Lots of evidence suggests that maintaining cellular phosphatidylcholine is important for longevity and optimal health. Remember the paper by Howard Federoff and the Georgetown team that demonstrated a deficiency of phosphatidylcholine predicts Alzheimer's?
viewtopic.php?f=4&t=312&hilit=Howard+Federoff%27s

I'm still unsure of the BEST way to achieve this goal. I'm currently taking 250 mg of citicholine (CDP choline) a precursor of phosphatidylcholine in the AM. It gives me a noticeable energy burst. Maybe the formula you're linking is superior?
GenePoole0304
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Re: Health, Cell Membranes and Phosphatidylcholine

Post by GenePoole0304 »

choline is needed in the brain and to get it is a breakdown product of PC.

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v4 ... 09922.html

Now will these other forms of choline CDP which had their benefits release choline where it is not wanted especially if the dose is too high.
I think it maybe important to get daily adequate amounts to help mitochondria function. Other form which help may be masking an underlying deficiency. I did find CDP Choline had some marginal benefit for myself.

I think mitochondria cell membrane health is over looked and E4 should look into it.

here is a good summary

http://nootriment.com/choline/



Abstract
Choline was officially recognized as an essential nutrient by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1998. There is a significant variation in the dietary requirement for choline that can be explained by common genetic polymorphisms. Because of its wide-ranging roles in human metabolism, from cell structure to neurotransmitter synthesis, choline-deficiency is now thought to have an impact on diseases such as liver disease, atherosclerosis and possibly neurological disorders. Choline is found in a wide variety of foods. Egg yolks are the most concentrated source of choline in the American diet, providing 680 milligrams per 100 grams. Mean choline intakes for older children, men, women and pregnant women are far below the Adequate Intake established by the IOM. Given the importance of choline in a wide range of critical functions in the human body, coupled with less than optimal intakes among the population, dietary guidance should be developed to encourage the intake of choline-rich foods.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2782876/

Juliegee would you know if PC is recommended by some of the top Alz researches and doctors?
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Re: Health, Cell Membranes and Phosphatidylcholine

Post by apod »

Juliegee wrote:I'm currently taking 250 mg of citicholine (CDP choline) a precursor of phosphatidylcholine in the AM. It gives me a noticeable energy burst. Maybe the formula you're linking is superior?
Interestingly, I find CDP Choline potentially relaxing, and not particularly energetic. I'll have to grab some GPC sometime to compare. I believe alpha GPC is more potent as a choline supplement (and elevates growth hormone / GABA), although CDP might be better studied and provide additional benefits outside of choline synthesis (raising dopamine receptors and function via Uridine) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citicolin ... _of_action
Alpha-GPC is 40% choline by weight, while CDP choline is 18%.

Phosphatidylserine is another beneficial phospholipid that might be low in the diet:
Image

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KatieS
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Re: Health, Cell Membranes and Phosphatidylcholine

Post by KatieS »

In Gene's article, certain genetic variations are more likely to have choline deficiency; citing this reference (http://www.pnas.org/content/102/44/16025.long). I think it's SNP rs2236225 with A (or T) the risk allele. Unlike my mom & brother, I have the risk AG, possibly explaining the mildly elevated liver enzymes & HCY.

Unfortunately, citicholine makes me feel too hyper, so recently I cut back to only a few times a week, after early morning exercise. But with this new information, I intend to restart taking this, add more eggs, beets, spinach and wheat germ.
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SusanJ
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Re: Health, Cell Membranes and Phosphatidylcholine

Post by SusanJ »

Well, I'm TT and was looking at choline because of Bredesen's protocol so I'll be looking into this more. Here's a couple more articles:

Common genetic polymorphisms affect the human requirement for the nutrient choline
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1574369/
In all women, 18 of the 23 (78%) carriers of the PEMT–744C allele (rs12325817) developed organ dysfunction when fed a low choline diet (odds ratio 25, P=0.002; Table 3). In postmenopausal women, 11 of 12 (92%) of the allele carriers developed organ dysfunction when fed a low choline diet, and the 2 women without this allele did not.

The first of two SNPs in the coding region of the CHDH gene (rs9001; +318 A→C) had a protective effect on susceptibility to developing organ dysfunction when fed a low choline diet in all subjects who carried the C allele (Table 4).

Dietary choline requirements of women: effects of estrogen and genetic variation
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20861172
This one says post-menopausal women need higher amounts of choline because of lower amounts of estrogen...
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Re: Health, Cell Membranes and Phosphatidylcholine

Post by circular »

Need to log this link somewhere. I don't have time to read it but it may be useful …

'Choline and Its Products Acetylcholine and Phosphatidylcholine'

http://wurtmanlab.mit.edu/static/pdf/1020.pdf
ApoE 3/4 > Thanks in advance for any responses made to my posts.
Harrison
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Re: Health, Cell Membranes and Phosphatidylcholine

Post by Harrison »

This keeps coming up over and over again.

I will refer to my last post (which in turn refers to my last post before that):

https://www.apoe4.info/forums/viewtopic ... 317#p22317

Choline can go to one of three pathways. It can acetylated to form the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (which we all know is decreased in Alzheimer's disease), it can be phosphorylated into CDP-choline, and it can oxidized into betaine, which helps convert homocysteine into methionine. The standard thinking is that most choline is converted to CDP-choline and then phosphatidylcholine, and that PEMT is used to form phosphatidylcholine when dietary choline is insufficient (this is most likely to occur during pregnancy).

According to a recent paper (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=26757190) phosphatidylcholine from PEMT was thought to be higher in Omega-3 than phosphatidylcholine from CDP-choline. If you really want to make sure you are maximizing your phosphatidylcholine production via PEMT, you could supplement with phosphatidylethanolamine, which is what PEMT converts to phosphatidylcholine.

As an aside, all of these phospholipids are present in the membranes of mitochondria, and I would guess that would be one major place where deficiency might come into play. Maybe supplementing directly with phosphatidylethanolamine in cases with SNPs leading to decreased PEMT activity?

Choline was extensively discussed in this thread: https://www.apoe4.info/forums/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=1487
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Re: Health, Cell Membranes and Phosphatidylcholine

Post by Stavia »

Thank you Harrison. You are our choline expert!
I really need to get my head around this and have a better approach than my current one of eating a couple of eggs now and then.
Are you still taking the same choline as in the choline thread?
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