Plasmologens for Neuroregeneration

Insights and discussion from the cutting edge with reference to journal articles and other research papers.
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Brian4
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Re: Plasmologens for Neuroregeneration

Post by Brian4 »

Lots of useful studies here –

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/?term=p ... rt=pubdate

– not all interventions with plasmalogens, but most are useful.
mike
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Re: Plasmologens for Neuroregeneration

Post by mike »

TheresaB wrote: Fri May 20, 2022 7:40 am
Evaluating Early Data on Focused Ultrasound for Patients With Alzheimer Disease
"For Alzheimer's, the blood-brain barrier has been a big problem in neuroscience to safely open, it’s possible if this can be done safely, it can be an effective way of clearing metabolites or pathological mediators. This study is looked at the first 10 subjects who underwent this procedure. “We demonstrated that we can safely, reversibly, and on-demand open the blood-brain barrier with focused ultrasound in mild Alzheimer's patients in all target regions—hippocampus, frontal lobes, and parietal lobes. There were no imaging adverse effects. There were no permanent clinical adverse effects, and the immediate blood-brain barrier opening was achieved within minutes of focused ultrasound treatment in the target region and resolved 24 to 48 hours later.“"
This sounds like it could be quite useful. But I worry that other nasties could also get inside during those 24 to 48 hours...
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Re: Plasmologens for Neuroregeneration

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MoJoe
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Re: Plasmologens for Neuroregeneration

Post by MoJoe »

See
THIS ARTICLE IS PART OF THE RESEARCH TOPIC
Solving the Plasmalogen Puzzle – From Basic Science to Clinical Application View all 13 Articles.
Google that, some articles are still embargoed, but all interesting reading.

Oral supplementation is successful and has been for many years, whether alkylglycerols or plasmaslogens themselves. Batyl, Chimyl and selachyl alcohols, identified as components of ether lipids by Tsujimoto and Toyama in 1922 have subsequently been used to reduce radiation damage, suppress tumour growth, wound healing etc. In peroxisome injury these same molecules have been the necessary precursors of plasmalogens in the endoplasmic reticulum. Maybe the puzzle of plasmalogens is nearly completed.
NF52
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Re: Plasmologens for Neuroregeneration

Post by NF52 »

Hi MoJoe,

Thanks for sharing such a rich resource! I've done a minor edit to provide the embedded link which shows the titles of the 13 articles, if you click on page 1 and 2 and a link from the article title to each one. For future use, the "Full Editor & Preview Page", which has a link under the "Quick Reply" box at the bottom of each post, allows you to insert links to outside sources using the icon that looks like a chain link.
MoJoe wrote: Sat Jun 04, 2022 7:38 pm
See
THIS ARTICLE IS PART OF THE RESEARCH TOPIC
Solving the Plasmalogen Puzzle – From Basic Science to Clinical Application
View all 13 Articles.
Google that, some articles are still embargoed, but all interesting reading.

Oral supplementation is successful and has been for many years, whether alkylglycerols or plasmaslogens themselves. Batyl, Chimyl and selachyl alcohols, identified as components of ether lipids by Tsujimoto and Toyama in 1922 have subsequently been used to reduce radiation damage, suppress tumour growth, wound healing etc. In peroxisome injury these same molecules have been the necessary precursors of plasmalogens in the endoplasmic reticulum. Maybe the puzzle of plasmalogens is nearly completed.
4/4 and still an optimist!
MoJoe
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Re: Plasmologens for Neuroregeneration

Post by MoJoe »

Thanks NF52. Your addition makes it a lot easier to access these articles
There are certainly some gold nuggets in the articles, only two are not immediately available. Have you got access to the article from Current Biology titled "Loss of functional heterogeneity along the CA3 transverse axis in aging", published 20th May 2022, DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2022.04.077.
Metta4
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Re: Plasmologens for Neuroregeneration

Post by Metta4 »

Hi all,

Just thought I'd share my N1 experience in case anyone is interested. I am electrically-sensitive, which means that microwave radiation and EMF fields affect me physically and especially mentally, with brain fog, confusion, fatigue, etc. Many of the supplements I was taking before I tested my APOE status overlap with some of the Bredesen protocol because they all protect the brain. The leading theory for how EMF-sensitivity affects the cell is that it floods the voltage gated calcium channels, impairing the barrier function, and many other functions in the brain, including autophagy. (There is more technical theorizing about reversing the polarity of electrons but that's beyond my pay grade.)

When I first heard about plasmalogens and the Prodrome trials I accidentally bought the Glial version, Omega-9s. This turned out to be a lucky mistake as I immediately noticed greater mental clarity. Then the next time around I tried the Omega-3 version. I decided I was seeing greater impact from the "Glial" version.

Thanks to this ongoing thread, I've been reading articles that referred to plasmalogens as a treatment for radiation, specifically that it protects the myelin sheaths in the CNS and the white matter in the brain. (Better explanations can be found in the articles themselves on pubmed.)

AT&T recently installed a wide area network transmitter 15 feet from where I sleep and it's definitely affecting me, but the plasmalogens seem to make a protective difference. (The greater the data compression in the packets of the signal, the worse the effects seem to be on biological organisms. 4G is worse than, 5G is worse than both, and WAN compression seems to be worst of all. )

I realize this topic may not be of interest to everyone on here, but I am working on the theory that the less robust repair mechanisms of APOE4s may be contributing to other vulnerabilities such as EMF-sensitivity.

Just wanted to share in case this observation helps someone else, since I've gotten so much help from this site.
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Re: Plasmologens for Neuroregeneration

Post by NF52 »

MoJoe wrote: Mon Jun 06, 2022 1:06 pm Thanks NF52. Your addition makes it a lot easier to access these articles
There are certainly some gold nuggets in the articles, only two are not immediately available. Have you got access to the article from Current Biology titled "Loss of functional heterogeneity along the CA3 transverse axis in aging", published 20th May 2022, DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2022.04.077.
It's behind a pay wall, but the summary includes the abstract and some graphs:
Loss of functional heterogeneity along the CA3 transverse axis in aging
4/4 and still an optimist!
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