Why Krill Oil Beats Fish Oil

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Mattsky
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Re: Why Krill Oil Beats Fish Oil

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Hi Therese . Thank you!
Mattsky
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Re: Why Krill Oil Beats Fish Oil

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TheresaB wrote: Tue Jan 16, 2024 1:31 pm
Mattsky wrote: Tue Jan 16, 2024 1:19 pm Hi.
Be careful what "Experts" you are listening to.
Rhonda Patric posted a paper "Role of phosphatidylcholine-DHA in preventing APOE4-associated Alzheimer’s disease" To support her claims, she cited a few studies, which is odd to me that she doesn't understand them. DHA from krill oil comes in free form, and they are not absorbed through BBB, LPC-dha is! Currently, there is no supplement on the market with this form. Aker Biomarine got permission from the FDA for their product Lysoveta that contains it to be sold in the USA only, yet still, it is not sold. So for now, your best bet is eating fish or fish-roe.
Dr Rhonda Patrick's paper that you referenced can be found here: Role of phosphatidylcholine-DHA in preventing APOE4-associated Alzheimer’s disease. She cites 86 footnotes, I wouldn't call that a few. Nevertheless, FYI she also advocates fish roe and fish.
Hi TheresaB yes I read this article. From her own citation: Sugasini, D., Thomas, R., Yalagala, P. C. R., Tai, L. M., Subbaiah, P. V. (2017) Dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as lysophosphatidylcholine, but not as free acid, enriches brain DHA and improves memory in adult mice. : "Most of the current supplements of DHA, including fish oil and krill oil, do not significantly increase brain DHA, because they are hydrolyzed to free DHA and are absorbed as triacylglycerol, whereas the transporter at the blood-brain barrier is specific for phospholipid form of DHA." in other words that krill oil is really a free DHA. I'm not an expert. I would love for krill to be effective. But If we look at the studies for age-related macular degeneration eating omega-3 from fish decreases the risk whereas supplements don't. The eyes are like the brain in terms of barrier permeability. If someone smarter just could tell me why her paper points to krill oil being absorbed whereas her citation does not, I would be really grateful.
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Re: Why Krill Oil Beats Fish Oil

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Mattsky wrote: Wed Jan 17, 2024 7:22 am Hi Therese . Thank you!
You're welcome, Mattsky!
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Re: Why Krill Oil Beats Fish Oil

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Mattsky wrote: Wed Jan 17, 2024 7:22 am yes I read this article.
Which article? Dr Patrick's Omega-3 fatty acids from her Found My Fitness website?
Or her 2018 paper, the above referenced Role of phosphatidylcholine-DHA in preventing APOE4-associated Alzheimer’s disease
Mattsky wrote: Wed Jan 17, 2024 7:22 am "Most of the current supplements of DHA, including fish oil and krill oil, do not significantly increase brain DHA, because they are hydrolyzed to free DHA and are absorbed as triacylglycerol, whereas the transporter at the blood-brain barrier is specific for phospholipid form of DHA." in other words that krill oil is really a free DHA.
That quote is from the abstract of this paper Dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as lysophosphatidylcholine, but not as free acid, enriches brain DHA and improves memory in adult mice. (Sugasini et al, Sep 2017) which was footnoted in Dr Patick's paper.

and also from the abstract of that paper,
Here we show that oral administration of DHA to normal adult mice as lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) (40 mg DHA/kg) for 30 days increased DHA content of the brain by >2-fold. In contrast, the same amount of free DHA did not increase brain DHA, but increased the DHA in adipose tissue and heart. Moreover, LPC-DHA treatment markedly improved the spatial learning and memory, as measured by Morris water maze test, whereas free DHA had no effect. The brain derived neurotrophic factor increased in all brain regions with LPC-DHA, but not with free DHA. These studies show that dietary LPC-DHA efficiently increases brain DHA content and improves brain function in adult mammals, thus providing a novel nutraceutical approach for the prevention and treatment of neurological diseases associated with DHA deficiency, such as Alzheimer’s disease.
Mattsky wrote: Wed Jan 17, 2024 7:22 am If someone smarter just could tell me why her paper points to krill oil being absorbed whereas her citation does not, I would be really grateful.
Figure 1 which summarizes the hypothesis of the Sugasini paper shows krill oil as being released as Free DHA.
In me this raises the question if it is a known fact that krill oil is released as Free DHA? Dr Patrick differentiates krill oil from the free fatty acid form.
DHA is metabolized differently depending on whether it is in phospholipid form (i.e., fish, fish roe, and krill oil), triglyceride form (i.e., fish and some DHA supplements), free fatty acid form (i.e., most DHA supplements), or ethyl ester form (i.e., most DHA supplements) (Fig. 5).
But her paper is also a hypothesis.
I propose that APOE4 carriers have impaired brain transport of free DHA but not of DHA-lysoPC, as a consequence of a breakdown in the outer membrane leaflet of the BBB, putting them at increased risk for AD. Dietary sources of DHA in phospholipid form may provide a means to increase plasma levels of DHA-lysoPC, thereby decreasing the risk of AD.
Dr Patrick is clear that there still are many unknowns,
DHA transport into the brain is disrupted in APOE4 transgenic mice and in APOE4 carriers (45, 46). However, which form of DHA transport, free DHA or DHA-lysoPC, is disrupted remains unknown.
When DHA is consumed in phospholipid form (as from dietary fish or seafood) more DHA appears in the plasma as DHA-lysoPC, which may be better transported across the BBB of APOE4 carriers. There is a pressing need for clinical trials evaluating the effects of ω-3 in phospholipid form, either from fish roe oil or krill oil, on cognitive function in APOE4 carriers with AD.
Regardless, krill oil also contains antioxidants, and choline which are also beneficial for healthy brain development and function.
-Theresa
ApoE 4/4
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