New, almost 50, with 1 copy Apoe4 and a family history.

Newcomer introductions, personal anecdotes, caregiver issues, lab results, and n=1 experimentation.
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technimom
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New, almost 50, with 1 copy Apoe4 and a family history.

Post by technimom »

Hi there!

I'm a 49 year old woman (will be 50 in May), and to be honest I'm kind of freaking out. I'm not sure if it's turning 50, or being in perimenopause, or what. But lately my anxiety and fear over alzheimer's has been through the roof. First, a brief family history.

My maternal grandmother had late onset alzheimers, along with about half of her siblings (she was one of 10). I remember her in the early stages around age 75. I was a teenager, and it was sad, and I braced myself for when my mom, and then I, would have it.

My mom was not as lucky as my grandmother. She, along with 2 of her 4 siblings, was diagnosed at age 63, with symptoms starting at 62. Prior to her generation, there had been no evidence of early onset in our family, so this came as quite a shock. My mom has 2 other siblings, her older sister and her younger sister, both now in their 70s and 80s with no symptoms. I do not know my mom's genetic status, she was never tested and it is too late now.

There was also dementia on her father's side of the family, 1 of his sisters had it, and he had it after a stroke, but they attributed it to the stroke, so not sure if it was alzheimer's or not.

My father is 81 and sharp as a tack with no history of dementia on his side of the family to his knowledge.

Based on my family history, I am assuming I have maybe 12 years before it hits me. I also assume I have at least a 50 percent chance of getting it. That seems to be the odds on my mother's side.

I am trying to do the lifestyle things. I have exercised regularly for years, I am at a healthy weight, I try to eat reasonably healthy although I need to cut out more sugar, I think. I take some supplements like fish oil, vitamin d, and vitamin b in the hail mary hope that it will do some good and maybe give me a few extra years, but I don't know. See here's the thing: my mother also exercised, and also tried to eat healthy, was at a healthy weight with no other comorbidities. Yet it got her at what I consider to be a young age. So I think now, that if you have bad genes, you're just screwed.

I still have 2 kids at home, ages 10 and 13, and I am an absolute wreck thinking about how they may have to deal with this in 12 years and turn into my caregivers. Honestly some days I can barely get out of bed.

I am seeing a therapist, and doing some breathing exercises to help reduce the anxiety. I am here because I still have a slim hope that prevention or delay might be possible, so I would like to learn what I can. I also am interested in others stories.

If you read all this, thank you for listening.
hollybourne
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Re: New, almost 50, with 1 copy Apoe4 and a family history.

Post by hollybourne »

technimom wrote: Sat Feb 03, 2024 6:00 pm Hi there!

I'm a 49 year old woman (will be 50 in May), and to be honest I'm kind of freaking out. I'm not sure if it's turning 50, or being in perimenopause, or what. But lately my anxiety and fear over alzheimer's has been through the roof. First, a brief family history.

My maternal grandmother had late onset alzheimers, along with about half of her siblings (she was one of 10). I remember her in the early stages around age 75. I was a teenager, and it was sad, and I braced myself for when my mom, and then I, would have it.

My mom was not as lucky as my grandmother. She, along with 2 of her 4 siblings, was diagnosed at age 63, with symptoms starting at 62. Prior to her generation, there had been no evidence of early onset in our family, so this came as quite a shock. My mom has 2 other siblings, her older sister and her younger sister, both now in their 70s and 80s with no symptoms. I do not know my mom's genetic status, she was never tested and it is too late now.

There was also dementia on her father's side of the family, 1 of his sisters had it, and he had it after a stroke, but they attributed it to the stroke, so not sure if it was alzheimer's or not.

My father is 81 and sharp as a tack with no history of dementia on his side of the family to his knowledge.

Based on my family history, I am assuming I have maybe 12 years before it hits me. I also assume I have at least a 50 percent chance of getting it. That seems to be the odds on my mother's side.

I am trying to do the lifestyle things. I have exercised regularly for years, I am at a healthy weight, I try to eat reasonably healthy although I need to cut out more sugar, I think. I take some supplements like fish oil, vitamin d, and vitamin b in the hail mary hope that it will do some good and maybe give me a few extra years, but I don't know. See here's the thing: my mother also exercised, and also tried to eat healthy, was at a healthy weight with no other comorbidities. Yet it got her at what I consider to be a young age. So I think now, that if you have bad genes, you're just screwed.

I still have 2 kids at home, ages 10 and 13, and I am an absolute wreck thinking about how they may have to deal with this in 12 years and turn into my caregivers. Honestly some days I can barely get out of bed.

I am seeing a therapist, and doing some breathing exercises to help reduce the anxiety. I am here because I still have a slim hope that prevention or delay might be possible, so I would like to learn what I can. I also am interested in others stories.

If you read all this, thank you for listening.
Hi Technimom -

I’m sending a virtual hug to you! My name is Holly and I am a Support Intern on this site and I welcome new members. First of all I want to recognize your honesty and your courage in sharing your struggles and reaching out to connect and get help. We are glad you are here and welcome you with open arms. I'm sorry you've had to struggle with family members with AD. I'm in the middle of this myself, and the slow loss is very painful. I do want to share some thoughts and tips below in the hopes of getting you out of the “freaking out” state, which is such an uncomfortable space to be in.

One of the favorite phrases around the subject of genes is that “genes load the gun, but lifestyle pulls the trigger.” Your genes are not your destiny and I know there are many 4/4’s on this site that are in their 80’s and doing great. You’ve already made good lifestyle choices, giving you a great start. You might consider digging into some of the prevention information on this site in order to optimize that.

The Primer is a detailed and informative resource written by a practicing M.D. with ApoE4/4. It includes information about the biochemistry of the ApoE4 gene and offers a variety of research-based prevention strategies.

You might consider learning about the Wahl’s Protocol or digging into Dr. Bredesen’s work. Dr Terry Wahls restored her health after being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (a neurodegenerative disease) by focusing on restoring her mitochondrial health. You can listen to her inspiring story in this 32 minute video: Minding your mitochondria | Dr. Terry Wahls | TEDxIowaCity. . Dr Wahls also has participated in an ApoE4.info 28 minute podcast: Terry Wahls, MD: Heal Neurodegeneration w/ Paleo Principles which also comes with written show-notes.

Dr. Bredesen is a leading scientist in brain health and offers a great deal of information on his website , along with paid programs for implementing lifestyle prevention choices. Many members are part of the PreCode and ReCode programs.

You mention perimenopause and I know that can effect physical and mental health! I suffered greatly from anxiety during this time and have since greatly improved my mental health with HRT. I’m not advocating for HRT as it’s a very personal choice and there is much research both for and against, but it might be worth a look here . I’m so glad you are seeking professional support for anxiety and depression and of course reaching out to the community which is all important for brain health!

Some helpful tips for moving around the site include the How-To Guide . It includes topics such as navigating the forum, private messaging, and searching. One great tip is using the quote (") button when replying to a post. Using the button will automatically alert the member of your response.

You can do some searching on other members’ experiences in Our Stories.

Technimom, I’m hopeful this accepting community will make you feel heard and supported, and provide valuable and actionable information for your journey.

Kindly,

Holly
TLS
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Re: New, almost 50, with 1 copy Apoe4 and a family history.

Post by TLS »

technimom wrote: Sat Feb 03, 2024 6:00 pm Hi there!

Based on my family history, I am assuming I have maybe 12 years before it hits me. I also assume I have at least a 50 percent chance of getting it. That seems to be the odds on my mother's side.

I am trying to do the lifestyle things. I have exercised regularly for years, I am at a healthy weight, I try to eat reasonably healthy although I need to cut out more sugar, I think. I take some supplements like fish oil, vitamin d, and vitamin b in the hail mary hope that it will do some good and maybe give me a few extra years, but I don't know. See here's the thing: my mother also exercised, and also tried to eat healthy, was at a healthy weight with no other comorbidities. Yet it got her at what I consider to be a young age. So I think now, that if you have bad genes, you're just screwed.
Your story is very similar to mine so I thought I would give you a virtual hug and some hope!

You are here at the right time and there is plenty you can do. Some things don't even take that long and can be incorporated into your day or week. Menopause can definitely add to anxiety too.

Here are some things I added a couple of years ago and they have made a difference. I took a mini test and feel better too.
  • Meditate 5 minutes each morning to a YouTube guided meditation put out by breathe.
  • Play Luminosity a couple of times a week. They offer a free version so you can see if you like it. I was terrible at the games initially but got better and they are fun!
  • Addressed nutritional deficiencies. In my case b12, zinc and iron
  • In the last few months targeted getting leafy greens daily
  • Eat fish once a week
If you take a look around in the Wiki's on this site you will find things you can look into. Take it a little bit at a time so it's not overwhelming. There are plenty of people on this site who have good advice and who also have the gene and are doing well.
apoe 3/4
NF52
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Re: New, almost 50, with 1 copy Apoe4 and a family history.

Post by NF52 »

technimom wrote: Sat Feb 03, 2024 6:00 pm Hi there!

I'm a 49 year old woman (will be 50 in May), and to be honest I'm kind of freaking out. I'm not sure if it's turning 50, or being in perimenopause, or what. But lately my anxiety and fear over alzheimer's has been through the roof. First, a brief family history.

My maternal grandmother had late onset alzheimers, along with about half of her siblings (she was one of 10). I remember her in the early stages around age 75. I was a teenager, and it was sad, and I braced myself for when my mom, and then I, would have it.

My mom was not as lucky as my grandmother. She, along with 2 of her 4 siblings, was diagnosed at age 63, with symptoms starting at 62. Prior to her generation, there had been no evidence of early onset in our family, so this came as quite a shock. My mom has 2 other siblings, her older sister and her younger sister, both now in their 70s and 80s with no symptoms. I do not know my mom's genetic status, she was never tested and it is too late now.

There was also dementia on her father's side of the family, 1 of his sisters had it, and he had it after a stroke, but they attributed it to the stroke, so not sure if it was alzheimer's or not.

My father is 81 and sharp as a tack with no history of dementia on his side of the family to his knowledge.

Based on my family history, I am assuming I have maybe 12 years before it hits me. I also assume I have at least a 50 percent chance of getting it. That seems to be the odds on my mother's side.

I am trying to do the lifestyle things. I have exercised regularly for years, I am at a healthy weight, I try to eat reasonably healthy although I need to cut out more sugar, I think. I take some supplements like fish oil, vitamin d, and vitamin b in the hail mary hope that it will do some good and maybe give me a few extra years, but I don't know. See here's the thing: my mother also exercised, and also tried to eat healthy, was at a healthy weight with no other comorbidities. Yet it got her at what I consider to be a young age. So I think now, that if you have bad genes, you're just screwed.

I still have 2 kids at home, ages 10 and 13, and I am an absolute wreck thinking about how they may have to deal with this in 12 years and turn into my caregivers. Honestly some days I can barely get out of bed.

I am seeing a therapist, and doing some breathing exercises to help reduce the anxiety. I am here because I still have a slim hope that prevention or delay might be possible, so I would like to learn what I can. I also am interested in others stories.

If you read all this, thank you for listening.
Welcome, technimom!

Please accept a warm hug from someone who is in your mom's decade (70's), with two copies of ApoE 4/4 and who has a daughter who could have written your story almost exactly. I believe with all my heart that your mother's tragically young diagnosis will not be your story and that you and my daughter will benefit from leaps in our knowledge of prevention and intervention that were unthinkable when she and I were approaching 50.

Here's why:
  • Like you, my daughter is at a healthy weight and has been a runner for years.
Hard to believe that your mom and I grew up hearing that obvious muscles in females were a turn-off, that women could jog, but shouldn't run, that organized sports were for guys. My HS gym class (all of one year) included synchronized swimming, volleyball, archery, and badminton.
  • Like you (from your username), she has a job that involves high-level problem-solving, learning new skills, working with others in teams and using tech as a tool in multiple complex forms. All of that confers cognitive reserve, consistently shown to be a significant association with resilience to genetic risks well into late life.
When your mom and I were in high school in the mid-to-late 1960's, many careers were effectively closed off to women. If women had a career, there was often no "work-life balance" and few supports in place. Jobs for both women and men too often included long hours, poor pay and stress that affected physical and emotional health in brains and hearts.
  • You and my daughter know you have ApoE 3/4 status and are empowered to advocate for your health, the same way women now know how to advocate for their needs in other areas of their lives.
Until very recently, women were assumed to NOT have cardiac issues, because they didn't typically have a fatal heart attack in their 50's or 60's, like too many men. When I found out my ApoE 4/4 status, I used LabCorp for direct-to-consumer blood tests like HbAiC, Vitamin D, iron, insulin resistance, C-reactive protein, Lp(a), NMR lipid profile for in-depth LDL. I then talked to my doctor about all of this and got a coronary artery scan to see if I had inherited my dad's arteries. It was a 65th birthday present to be told my coronary artery age was 39! Like you, I take supplements that my mother never had the chance to know were important.
  • Like you, my daughter is having a big birthday in May (40 for her).
We now know that women's brains are rich with estrogen and that hormone replacement therapies may be helpful at the right time. "Perimenopause' was not a term we learned, nor was 'brain fog" and doctors sincerely believed after 2000 that HRT would cause heart attacks--only later realizing that was only true when started long after menopause.
  • Like you, my daughter has two wonderful children, each two years younger than yours, and like you, her father does not have a high risk of AD, with ApoE 3/3.
Her dad (my husband) is a decade younger than your dad. Since your dad is 81 with a keen brain, you both have 50% of your DNA from the healthy brains of your dads!
  • Your mother was likely as much affected by her father's history of a stroke, which is a direct cause of vascular dementia. You don't carry that "first-degree relative with a stroke risk"
You may want to talk with your doctor about vascular health, and even about an initial visit to a cardiologist for prevention. Treadmill stress tests can be an easy way to learn your heart is doing just fine!
  • Her diagnosis at age 63 would be considered "young onset" and seems to be sporadic, often not occurring at the same age in siblings and children due to different early and mid-life risks, including environment, head injuries, exposure to pollution and. toxins, metabolic, vascular, auto-immune or inflammation factors. Most of those risks were unrecognized when she was 50.
Just in the last year, blood tests have come out that can detect early signs of amyloid and tau--years before either reach critical levels in the brain and at far less cost and need for expensive PET scans or lumbar CSF punctures. Right now those are only used in clinical trials, like the AHEAD prevention trial I am in. But every researcher I hear is convinced that these discoveries, like those of early trials in cancer, HIV, heart disease and other illnesses , will lead to increased awareness, diagnosis, prevention, and treatments that improve our "health span" and our lifespan. Your mother would want you to plan on writing that story for yourself--not repeating hers.

You and my daughter both leave me deeply grateful to see this next generation of women take its place. Let the next decade be a time to enjoy the rollercoaster of teen years (and perimenpause!) and let those of us in clinical trials, and using protocols for healthy brains, learn more about how to prevent Alzheimer's. We want you to celebrate your 60th birthday with joy in 2034.

Nancy
4/4 and still an optimist!
technimom
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Re: New, almost 50, with 1 copy Apoe4 and a family history.

Post by technimom »

NF52 wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:28 am
technimom wrote: Sat Feb 03, 2024 6:00 pm Hi there!

I'm a 49 year old woman (will be 50 in May), and to be honest I'm kind of freaking out. I'm not sure if it's turning 50, or being in perimenopause, or what. But lately my anxiety and fear over alzheimer's has been through the roof. First, a brief family history.

My maternal grandmother had late onset alzheimers, along with about half of her siblings (she was one of 10). I remember her in the early stages around age 75. I was a teenager, and it was sad, and I braced myself for when my mom, and then I, would have it.

My mom was not as lucky as my grandmother. She, along with 2 of her 4 siblings, was diagnosed at age 63, with symptoms starting at 62. Prior to her generation, there had been no evidence of early onset in our family, so this came as quite a shock. My mom has 2 other siblings, her older sister and her younger sister, both now in their 70s and 80s with no symptoms. I do not know my mom's genetic status, she was never tested and it is too late now.

There was also dementia on her father's side of the family, 1 of his sisters had it, and he had it after a stroke, but they attributed it to the stroke, so not sure if it was alzheimer's or not.

My father is 81 and sharp as a tack with no history of dementia on his side of the family to his knowledge.

Based on my family history, I am assuming I have maybe 12 years before it hits me. I also assume I have at least a 50 percent chance of getting it. That seems to be the odds on my mother's side.

I am trying to do the lifestyle things. I have exercised regularly for years, I am at a healthy weight, I try to eat reasonably healthy although I need to cut out more sugar, I think. I take some supplements like fish oil, vitamin d, and vitamin b in the hail mary hope that it will do some good and maybe give me a few extra years, but I don't know. See here's the thing: my mother also exercised, and also tried to eat healthy, was at a healthy weight with no other comorbidities. Yet it got her at what I consider to be a young age. So I think now, that if you have bad genes, you're just screwed.

I still have 2 kids at home, ages 10 and 13, and I am an absolute wreck thinking about how they may have to deal with this in 12 years and turn into my caregivers. Honestly some days I can barely get out of bed.

I am seeing a therapist, and doing some breathing exercises to help reduce the anxiety. I am here because I still have a slim hope that prevention or delay might be possible, so I would like to learn what I can. I also am interested in others stories.

If you read all this, thank you for listening.
Welcome, technimom!

Please accept a warm hug from someone who is in your mom's decade (70's), with two copies of ApoE 4/4 and who has a daughter who could have written your story almost exactly. I believe with all my heart that your mother's tragically young diagnosis will not be your story and that you and my daughter will benefit from leaps in our knowledge of prevention and intervention that were unthinkable when she and I were approaching 50.

Here's why:
  • Like you, my daughter is at a healthy weight and has been a runner for years.
Hard to believe that your mom and I grew up hearing that obvious muscles in females were a turn-off, that women could jog, but shouldn't run, that organized sports were for guys. My HS gym class (all of one year) included synchronized swimming, volleyball, archery, and badminton.
  • Like you (from your username), she has a job that involves high-level problem-solving, learning new skills, working with others in teams and using tech as a tool in multiple complex forms. All of that confers cognitive reserve, consistently shown to be a significant association with resilience to genetic risks well into late life.
When your mom and I were in high school in the mid-to-late 1960's, many careers were effectively closed off to women. If women had a career, there was often no "work-life balance" and few supports in place. Jobs for both women and men too often included long hours, poor pay and stress that affected physical and emotional health in brains and hearts.
  • You and my daughter know you have ApoE 3/4 status and are empowered to advocate for your health, the same way women now know how to advocate for their needs in other areas of their lives.
Until very recently, women were assumed to NOT have cardiac issues, because they didn't typically have a fatal heart attack in their 50's or 60's, like too many men. When I found out my ApoE 4/4 status, I used LabCorp for direct-to-consumer blood tests like HbAiC, Vitamin D, iron, insulin resistance, C-reactive protein, Lp(a), NMR lipid profile for in-depth LDL. I then talked to my doctor about all of this and got a coronary artery scan to see if I had inherited my dad's arteries. It was a 65th birthday present to be told my coronary artery age was 39! Like you, I take supplements that my mother never had the chance to know were important.
  • Like you, my daughter is having a big birthday in May (40 for her).
We now know that women's brains are rich with estrogen and that hormone replacement therapies may be helpful at the right time. "Perimenopause' was not a term we learned, nor was 'brain fog" and doctors sincerely believed after 2000 that HRT would cause heart attacks--only later realizing that was only true when started long after menopause.
  • Like you, my daughter has two wonderful children, each two years younger than yours, and like you, her father does not have a high risk of AD, with ApoE 3/3.
Her dad (my husband) is a decade younger than your dad. Since your dad is 81 with a keen brain, you both have 50% of your DNA from the healthy brains of your dads!
  • Your mother was likely as much affected by her father's history of a stroke, which is a direct cause of vascular dementia. You don't carry that "first-degree relative with a stroke risk"
You may want to talk with your doctor about vascular health, and even about an initial visit to a cardiologist for prevention. Treadmill stress tests can be an easy way to learn your heart is doing just fine!
  • Her diagnosis at age 63 would be considered "young onset" and seems to be sporadic, often not occurring at the same age in siblings and children due to different early and mid-life risks, including environment, head injuries, exposure to pollution and. toxins, metabolic, vascular, auto-immune or inflammation factors. Most of those risks were unrecognized when she was 50.
Just in the last year, blood tests have come out that can detect early signs of amyloid and tau--years before either reach critical levels in the brain and at far less cost and need for expensive PET scans or lumbar CSF punctures. Right now those are only used in clinical trials, like the AHEAD prevention trial I am in. But every researcher I hear is convinced that these discoveries, like those of early trials in cancer, HIV, heart disease and other illnesses , will lead to increased awareness, diagnosis, prevention, and treatments that improve our "health span" and our lifespan. Your mother would want you to plan on writing that story for yourself--not repeating hers.

You and my daughter both leave me deeply grateful to see this next generation of women take its place. Let the next decade be a time to enjoy the rollercoaster of teen years (and perimenpause!) and let those of us in clinical trials, and using protocols for healthy brains, learn more about how to prevent Alzheimer's. We want you to celebrate your 60th birthday with joy in 2034.

Nancy
Thank you so much, it is really nice to hear from someone from my mom's generation who is in a similar genetic position. Everything you said really gives me hope! Your daughter sounds like an amazing woman!

My mom would have been 77 if she were still here. She was a social worker, a pretty high stress job. I am more like my dad - he was a clinical psychologist who went back to school to become a computer programmer. I am an engineer/programmer who thinks it would have been cool to be a psychologist lol. I love my work, it makes my brain feel at its best and I hope to keep doing it for a long time. This is another thing that worries me though. What if I can't...

One thing that really worries me is that among my mom's siblings, 3 of the 5 of them got early onset AZ despite no previous family history of early onset. I keep wondering what could have caused that and why the other 2 didn't get it. Did they all ingest too much fertilizer and turkey poop as kids (they grew up on a turkey farm) ? It makes no sense to me, but I have to accept that I will never know.

Thank you for participating in the clinical studies to help other people in this situation. That really means a lot.
technimom
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Re: New, almost 50, with 1 copy Apoe4 and a family history.

Post by technimom »

TLS wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 7:24 am
technimom wrote: Sat Feb 03, 2024 6:00 pm Hi there!

Based on my family history, I am assuming I have maybe 12 years before it hits me. I also assume I have at least a 50 percent chance of getting it. That seems to be the odds on my mother's side.

I am trying to do the lifestyle things. I have exercised regularly for years, I am at a healthy weight, I try to eat reasonably healthy although I need to cut out more sugar, I think. I take some supplements like fish oil, vitamin d, and vitamin b in the hail mary hope that it will do some good and maybe give me a few extra years, but I don't know. See here's the thing: my mother also exercised, and also tried to eat healthy, was at a healthy weight with no other comorbidities. Yet it got her at what I consider to be a young age. So I think now, that if you have bad genes, you're just screwed.
Your story is very similar to mine so I thought I would give you a virtual hug and some hope!

You are here at the right time and there is plenty you can do. Some things don't even take that long and can be incorporated into your day or week. Menopause can definitely add to anxiety too.

Here are some things I added a couple of years ago and they have made a difference. I took a mini test and feel better too.
  • Meditate 5 minutes each morning to a YouTube guided meditation put out by breathe.
  • Play Luminosity a couple of times a week. They offer a free version so you can see if you like it. I was terrible at the games initially but got better and they are fun!
  • Addressed nutritional deficiencies. In my case b12, zinc and iron
  • In the last few months targeted getting leafy greens daily
  • Eat fish once a week
If you take a look around in the Wiki's on this site you will find things you can look into. Take it a little bit at a time so it's not overwhelming. There are plenty of people on this site who have good advice and who also have the gene and are doing well.
Thank you so much, I will look into all of those things. i have an appointment this week with a neurologist who specializes in prevention, so I am interested to see what she says.
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Re: New, almost 50, with 1 copy Apoe4 and a family history.

Post by mike »

technimom wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 1:39 pm One thing that really worries me is that among my mom's siblings, 3 of the 5 of them got early onset AZ despite no previous family history of early onset. I keep wondering what could have caused that and why the other 2 didn't get it. Did they all ingest too much fertilizer and turkey poop as kids (they grew up on a turkey farm) ? It makes no sense to me, but I have to accept that I will never know.
Many folks without ApoE4 get AD. For these it is often environment that cause it. Some kind of toxin or virus or poor diet/exercise. Lots of weird stuff used on farms over the last 50 years...

One of my DNA cousins left England and went to Australia. All of his many siblings who stayed died young because of the coal dust... Times change.
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Re: New, almost 50, with 1 copy Apoe4 and a family history.

Post by J11 »

technimom, I know how much dementia can freak people out, though I would suggest that you dial back this fear.
Perhaps over the next few months to year we will see an inexpensive blood test that potentially could give you warning of approaching onset of AD dementia 15 years forward. That would be incredibly helpful. Dementia does not need to sneak up on you. Also even basic cognitive tests like the logical memory delayed test can give you quite a bit of insight. My feeling is that with early warning, emerging treatments and help from this community that you have a good chance of maintaining your cognitive abilities through a considerable amount of time.
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Re: New, almost 50, with 1 copy Apoe4 and a family history.

Post by TheresaB »

You are already doing many important things that will help delay/avoid dementia. Good for you!
technimom wrote: Sat Feb 03, 2024 6:00 pm I am here because I still have a slim hope that prevention or delay might be possible, so I would like to learn what I can. I also am interested in others stories.
I am here to tell you there is hope! I wish I was 49 when I learned my status. Holding one 4 allele is daunting, but in a way it’s a blessing, research has learned so much about our genotype over recent years. ε4 carriers have been found to respond differently than noncarriers to environmental, cognitive, pharmacological, dietary and exercise-based interventions, but we didn’t know that just a few years ago!

Dr Dale Bredesen, neurodegeneration disease researcher has said, “Alzheimer’s should be a rare disease” never once has he said “except for ApoE4 carriers.”
technimom wrote: Sat Feb 03, 2024 6:00 pmSee here's the thing: my mother also exercised, and also tried to eat healthy, was at a healthy weight with no other comorbidities. Yet it got her at what I consider to be a young age. So I think now, that if you have bad genes, you're just screwed.
On the other side of the coin, ε4 is but one factor contributing to Alzheimer's. ApoE4 is not a deterministic gene, some ε4s get Alzheimer's, some don't, and ε2 and ε3 carriers get Alzheimer's too. We can influence our genes and many of the other factors that contribute to AD.

There’s a term gaining popularity in the dementia realm, “precision medicine” which recognizes that Alzheimer’s is a multi-factored disease and each individual has a different set factors or “holes” which drives the disease in them. If an individual’s “holes” can be identified early and addressed, cognitive decline can be avoided and even reversed. Dr Bredesen has reversed cognitive decline. You can read more about him in our ApoE4 wiki, Bredesen Protocol. Some choose to use his prevention protocol Precode available through Apollo Health

Other options include:
*a functional medicine doctor Searching for a Healthcare Practitioner
*some have found this tool helpful Function Health
*Some use a health coach ApoE4 Aware Health Coaches
*Others take a more DIY approach and use direct consumer testing to help identify and address individual holesDirect to Lab Testing Options
*Some use the program outlined in Dr Bredesen’s Book The End of Alzheimer's Program

Since you mention a maternal following of Alzheimer’s, areas to especially explore may be hormone replacement treatment or focusing on mitochondrial health. We have a wiki on that Mitochondria . The mitochondria provide energy to our cells and the brain is an especially hungry energy hog. Mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the earliest and most prominent features of Alzheimer’s Disease and mitochondrial DNA in humans is inherited from a person's mother.

Just some thoughts for you (okay a lot, hope I haven’t scared you). I’m rooting for you, it isn’t easy, but it will be worth it. Best of health to you.
-Theresa
ApoE 4/4
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