ApoE4 and life expectancy/longevity

A primer for newbies and old pros alike.
User avatar
TheresaB
Mod
Mod
Posts: 1621
Joined: Wed Feb 03, 2016 9:46 am
Location: Front Range, CO

Re: ApoE4 and life expectancy/longevity

Post by TheresaB »

This paper was posted on the ApoE4.info Facebook page: and just published 7 days ago (Mar 1, 2024):

How are APOE4, changes in body weight, and longevity related? Insights from a causal mediation analysis
This finding is in line with the idea that the detrimental effect of APOE4 on longevity is, in part, related to the accelerated physical aging of ε4 carriers.
There are also a number of other references supporting decreased longevity in the ApoE4.info wiki article ApoE ε4 and health conditions besides (or maybe contributing to) Alzheimer’s under that last subheading entitled "Decreased Longevity"
-Theresa
ApoE 4/4
Plumster
Senior Contributor
Senior Contributor
Posts: 631
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2017 6:19 pm

Re: ApoE4 and life expectancy/longevity

Post by Plumster »

I was just watching this video/transcript from Nutritionfacts that came out two days ago: APOE—The Single Most Important Gene for Longevity" in which Dr. Greger suggests that high cholesterol levels in Apoe4 may be the main cause for less longevity. He proposes that e4s lower LDL by lowering saturated fat and cholesterol in your diet.
e3/4 MTHFR C677T/A1298C COMT V158M++ COMT H62H++ MTRR A66G ++ HLA DR
NF52
Support Team
Support Team
Posts: 2855
Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2016 9:41 am
Location: Eastern U.S.

Re: ApoE4 and life expectancy/longevity

Post by NF52 »

sahara wrote: Thu Mar 07, 2024 11:13 am This is interesting: Polygenic Propensity for Longevity, APOE-ε4 Status, Dementia Diagnosis, and Risk for Cause-Specific Mortality: A Large Population-Based Longitudinal Study of Older Adults
https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontol ... 73/7223000

Accept my apology if it's been cited on another thread.
No apologies needed, "sahara", since I don't think anyone else is reading the Nov. 2023 Journals of Gerontology. [Too bad, since we need many more geriatricians and gerontologists for us Baby Boomers, in my opinion.]

The authors, from the University College in London, which does some great work in leading UK dementia research, write in fairly dense prose. But if I got the gist, they seem to be saying that aside from the risk of dementia, ApoE 4 carriers, especially women, have a lower risk of death from cancer and "all-cause mortality", but that benefit was outweighed by a 24% increased risk of death from dementia compared to non-carriers, which increased to about a third more risk than non-carriers after age 75.
In gender-stratified analyses, APOE-ε4 status was associated with a reduced risk for all-cause mortality and mortalities related to cancers in women. Mediation analyses estimated that the percent excess risk of APOE-ε4 on other causes of mortality risk explained by the dementia diagnosis was 24%, which increased to 34% when the sample was restricted to adults who were aged ≤75 years old. To reduce the mortality rate in adults who are aged ≥50 years old, it is essential to prevent dementia onset in the general population.
That was true in my mother's family of 11 children, all of whom lived to adulthood. With the exception of the oldest, a sister who died of pancreatic cancer in her 40's, after significant auto-immune issues, the earliest to die was a brother whose heart attack happened at age 70. Most were healthy well into in their late 80's and died with, but not from moderate to severe mixed dementia after a brief respiratory or cardiac illness. The second oldest was cognitively healthy to age 97 (possibly a non-carrier of ApoE 4) and then died in his sleep after a nice walk. None of my 20+ cousins who are now mostly in their late 70's has had a serious cancer, but I suspect that many carry the ApoE 4 allele, since two have died with Alzheimer's in their early 70's.

Have you noticed that in your own family history?

Given the anti-cancer protection, if we could only get the Alzheimer's/vascular/Parkinson's risk taken care of--we might get to 100!

By the way, welcome back after not posting since pre-COVID. Hope you continue to share gems like this.

Nancy
4/4 and still an optimist!
Post Reply