44 Years Old, 4/4

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EA1979
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Joined: Tue Apr 16, 2024 3:14 pm

44 Years Old, 4/4

Post by EA1979 »

Hi all, thank you for having me!

I am a 44 year male from Minnesota. My mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's at the age of 58, almost 14 years ago. It was hard to watch her progression on the disease, and I knew it was something I wanted to avoid. I lived a (mostly) healthy lifestyle with plenty of exercise (strength + running), and mostly eating healthy.

My mom finally passed this year, which led me to start getting more serious about my own risk factors and what I could do to avoid Alzheimer's myself. Here's what I've learned since September 2023:

The Bad
--Genetic testing confirms that I am APOE 4/4
--Elevated cholesterol (249 total, 55 HDL, 169 LDL)
--Elevated APOB (133) and Lp(a)
--Elevated homocysteine (12.9)
--My (mostly) healthy diet had led me to a 28 BMI

The Good
--Glucose and A1c are OK (93/5.4 could be a bit better)
--Good base of daily exercise
--Good sleep (7+ hours every night)
--Good social supports
--Mentally stimulating work and home life

I've really focused on changing my diet to reflect what I've learned. I was into the "more protein GOOD" sort of concept (not carnivore or anything, but prioritizing adding protein to most meals). This experience has really led me to focus more on vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts as the base of my diet. I've dropped about 10 pounds, although I have more to do.

Supplements:
Vitamin B6/B9/B12
Vitamin D/K
Vitamin E
Fish Oil
Choline

Supplements I am considering but have not yet decided upon:
Turmeric
CoQ10
Luteolin
Quercetin
Low dose lithium

Advice on fasting: the 14+ hour fasts end up making me very hungry, which seems to lead me to unhealthy food choices. Any advice on avoiding that trap?

Thanks!
JulieMorris
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Posts: 39
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2024 10:47 am
Location: Oklahoma
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Re: 44 Years Old, 4/4

Post by JulieMorris »

EA1979 wrote: Tue Apr 16, 2024 3:50 pm Hi all, thank you for having me!

I am a 44 year male from Minnesota. My mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's at the age of 58, almost 14 years ago. It was hard to watch her progression on the disease, and I knew it was something I wanted to avoid. I lived a (mostly) healthy lifestyle with plenty of exercise (strength + running), and mostly eating healthy.

My mom finally passed this year, which led me to start getting more serious about my own risk factors and what I could do to avoid Alzheimer's myself. Here's what I've learned since September 2023:

The Bad
--Genetic testing confirms that I am APOE 4/4
--Elevated cholesterol (249 total, 55 HDL, 169 LDL)
--Elevated APOB (133) and Lp(a)
--Elevated homocysteine (12.9)
--My (mostly) healthy diet had led me to a 28 BMI

The Good
--Glucose and A1c are OK (93/5.4 could be a bit better)
--Good base of daily exercise
--Good sleep (7+ hours every night)
--Good social supports
--Mentally stimulating work and home life

I've really focused on changing my diet to reflect what I've learned. I was into the "more protein GOOD" sort of concept (not carnivore or anything, but prioritizing adding protein to most meals). This experience has really led me to focus more on vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts as the base of my diet. I've dropped about 10 pounds, although I have more to do.

Supplements:
Vitamin B6/B9/B12
Vitamin D/K
Vitamin E
Fish Oil
Choline

Supplements I am considering but have not yet decided upon:
Turmeric
CoQ10
Luteolin
Quercetin
Low dose lithium

Advice on fasting: the 14+ hour fasts end up making me very hungry, which seems to lead me to unhealthy food choices. Any advice on avoiding that trap?

Thanks!
Hi EA1979,

I'm a support team intern, and I'd like to welcome you to this site! You have found a very supportive community here. First, I want to say that I'm very sorry for the loss of your mother. I can't imagine what you have been through, but it's clear that you are a loving son, who provided your mom with consistent support. Second, I want to applaud your determination and love of learning. It takes a lot of self-discipline and perseverance to change your food habits, and you are on your way! You have already taken many excellent steps towards better brain health, as exercise is the most-researched way to maintain brain health. In addition, you are eating healthy most of the time, and taking some excellent supplements.

Your love of learning is apparent with all that you said you have learned in 1 and a half years! To learn even more, it would be a great idea to first take a look at our Primer. It is an incredible resource of information about the biochemistry of ApoE4. It offers researched-based prevention strategies and was written by a practicing M.D. with ApoE4. Do not become overwhelmed with all the information. Sometimes it is best to slowly read through it, decide which section resonates with you, and focus on that area first.

The How-To Guide will help you learn how to navigate this site. It includes topics such as navigating the forum, private messaging, and searching.

You can find other members' experiences in Our Stories. Sometimes reading the stories of others helps us realize that we are not alone.

Regarding the supplements you are considering, here's some information on the use of turmeric in preventing Alzheimers: Turmeric

With the fasting dilemma, are you talking about fasting from dinner to breakfast (or your first meal)? If so, what works for me is brushing my teeth if I start to get a craving. Somehow that minty toothpaste taste makes me no longer want to eat right away! If you're speaking about a day fast, however, I'm not sure, but some other members with more experience will likely have an answer for you.

I'm so glad you have joined us on this site. Thank you so much for sharing part of your story. Please feel free to reach out anytime with questions or if you just need support. You are not alone. We are here for you.
PhD in Speech-Language Pathology
Functional Medicine Certified Health Coach
Interested in all things brain-related
EA1979
Contributor
Contributor
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Apr 16, 2024 3:14 pm

Re: 44 Years Old, 4/4

Post by EA1979 »

Thank you for the information!
HelenOwens
Support Team Intern
Support Team Intern
Posts: 46
Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2024 1:23 pm
Location: Massachusetts

Re: 44 Years Old, 4/4

Post by HelenOwens »

EA1979 wrote: Tue Apr 16, 2024 3:50 pm Hi all, thank you for having me!

I am a 44 year male from Minnesota. My mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer's at the age of 58, almost 14 years ago. It was hard to watch her progression on the disease, and I knew it was something I wanted to avoid. I lived a (mostly) healthy lifestyle with plenty of exercise (strength + running), and mostly eating healthy.

My mom finally passed this year, which led me to start getting more serious about my own risk factors and what I could do to avoid Alzheimer's myself. Here's what I've learned since September 2023:

The Bad
--Genetic testing confirms that I am APOE 4/4
--Elevated cholesterol (249 total, 55 HDL, 169 LDL)
--Elevated APOB (133) and Lp(a)
--Elevated homocysteine (12.9)
--My (mostly) healthy diet had led me to a 28 BMI

The Good
--Glucose and A1c are OK (93/5.4 could be a bit better)
--Good base of daily exercise
--Good sleep (7+ hours every night)
--Good social supports
--Mentally stimulating work and home life

I've really focused on changing my diet to reflect what I've learned. I was into the "more protein GOOD" sort of concept (not carnivore or anything, but prioritizing adding protein to most meals). This experience has really led me to focus more on vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts as the base of my diet. I've dropped about 10 pounds, although I have more to do.

Supplements:
Vitamin B6/B9/B12
Vitamin D/K
Vitamin E
Fish Oil
Choline

Supplements I am considering but have not yet decided upon:
Turmeric
CoQ10
Luteolin
Quercetin
Low dose lithium

Advice on fasting: the 14+ hour fasts end up making me very hungry, which seems to lead me to unhealthy food choices. Any advice on avoiding that trap?

Thanks!

Hi EA1979,

I am so very sorry for the loss of your mother. As JulieMorris said, you have already taken great steps toward better brain health. Recognizing and being aware of the factors within your control is half the battle.

As for your question about fasting and your hunger leading to unhealthy food choices, I wanted to offer some thoughts and my personal strategies in case you may find them helpful.

I’m not familiar with your diet outside of your fasting hours, so this is just generally speaking - hunger/cravings could be an indicator of imbalance in blood sugar. Perhaps take a look at your protein/fats/carbs balance and you may find that increasing your good protein and good fat intake, while lowering carbs helps stabilize your hunger and cravings.

When breaking a fast, it is an opportunity to reset your microbiome and giving the good bacteria in your gut a chance to thrive. Supporting your microbiome with pre/probiotics foods, polyphenols, healthy fats and protein helps with gut healing and allowing those good bacteria to “outspeak” the bad bacteria that contribute to those cravings. Such foods as avocado, kefir/fermented yogurt (I love coconut yogurt like CocoJune), bone broth, olives, sauerkraut, kimchi, nuts/seeds, eggs are some of my personal go-to’s to help me continue to make good choices and curb cravings.

I also find that the later I eat in the evening, the more likely my stomach will be growling in protest in the morning. I find that making my last bite of food at least 4 hours before laying down for bed makes me less hungry in the morning fasting hours.

Some of my other personal strategies:
Distractions that elevate my mood – walking, getting involved/busy in a task, call a friend, etc.
Self-reflection – What is my purpose for fasting? What is my Why?
Drink to curb craving/hunger – my personal favorites are a comforting, warm cuppa green/herbal tea in my favorite mug or sparkling (unflavored) mineral water with a squeeze of lemon in a fancy glass 😊
MCT oil in coffee

If you are new to fasting, give yourself grace. It will take some time to fine-tune and find the strategies that work for you. If you are not new to fasting, give yourself grace. It takes time for our bodies to adapt.

I hope some of this is helpful for you.
Helen :-)
Helen
Functional Medicine Certified Health Coach
EA1979
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Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Apr 16, 2024 3:14 pm

Re: 44 Years Old, 4/4

Post by EA1979 »

Thank you Helen, this is definitely helpful. I appreciate the feedback on the fasting, and the comments about carbohydrates leading to more carb desire definitely resonate with me. I will stick with it and see how things go, and I appreciate the advice on foods to eat at the end of the fast!
HelenOwens
Support Team Intern
Support Team Intern
Posts: 46
Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2024 1:23 pm
Location: Massachusetts

Re: 44 Years Old, 4/4

Post by HelenOwens »

EA1979 wrote: Wed Apr 17, 2024 8:42 am Thank you Helen, this is definitely helpful. I appreciate the feedback on the fasting, and the comments about carbohydrates leading to more carb desire definitely resonate with me. I will stick with it and see how things go, and I appreciate the advice on foods to eat at the end of the fast!
I'm so glad you found this helpful. Please keep us posted and don't hesitate to reach out with any more questions!
Helen
Functional Medicine Certified Health Coach
AnnieV
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Contributor
Posts: 40
Joined: Wed Mar 20, 2024 10:27 am

Re: 44 Years Old, 4/4

Post by AnnieV »

EA1979,

I wish you the very best of success. You can normalize the numbers. As you listed there are many things to improve. Take it slowly but with relentless deliberation, you will get there.

Besides removing all the addicting and corrupted consumables our Americanized diet contains and replacing them with whole, real, organic consumables, I highly recommend consuming kefir made from real/raw milk (NOT store milk) from an established farm distributor and/or Raw Farm's product that comes from California. That single change I made with my mom and me was a game changer. Only half a cup a day is needed to radically reduce homocysteine among so many other benefits.
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