Modifiable risks and APOE 4/4

Alzheimer's, cardiovascular, and other chronic diseases; biomarkers, lifestyle, supplements, drugs, and health care.
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Smithb
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Modifiable risks and APOE 4/4

Post by Smithb »

Im APOE 4/4 and 23andMe said having a 4/4 gives you a 28% chance of contracting it by 75, 50% by 85.

Does following the practices Dr. Attia promotes decrease the risk to normal level? Assuming the majority of those with the 3/4 and 4/4 that get AD did not take any preventable measures such as exercise or proper diet.

I also have no family history of AD all the way to my grandfathers grandparents, will that further reduce my chances?
hollybourne
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Re: Modifiable risks and APOE 4/4

Post by hollybourne »

Smithb wrote: Sat Feb 17, 2024 3:15 pm Im APOE 4/4 and 23andMe said having a 4/4 gives you a 28% chance of contracting it by 75, 50% by 85.

Does following the practices Dr. Attia promotes decrease the risk to normal level? Assuming the majority of those with the 3/4 and 4/4 that get AD did not take any preventable measures such as exercise or proper diet.

I also have no family history of AD all the way to my grandfathers grandparents, will that further reduce my chances?
Hi Smithb -

My name is Holly and I am one of the Support Team Interns here on the site. I see that you are new and I’d like to officially welcome you!

Thank you for sharing your curiosity on Peter Attia and his protocols. He certainly has a large body of knowledge on physical and mental longevity. I have not yet read his book called Outlive, but I plan to!

It would be great if we could conclude Peter Attia’s protocols will lower a 4/4’s chances to normal, but I don't know how that would be possible. It is a great question for those that like to dig into the research! Dr. Bredesen's ReCode system does claim to reverse Alzheimer's disease. I’m not sure if Peter’s protocol lines up well with Dr. Bredesen’s. I haven’t seen Peter comment on the ReCode program and I listen to most of his podcasts. The forum may provide some information. You might start with a few conversations about Peter Attia on the forum here and here .

I’m happy to hear you have no family history. That is certainly positive. When diseases tend to run in families, heredity may play a role.

As a Support Intern, I’d like to provide a few tips for moving around the site. The Primer is a detailed and informative resource written by a practicing M.D. with ApoE4/4. It includes information about the biochemistry of the ApoE4 gene and offers a variety of research-based prevention strategies.

The How-To Guide . It includes topics such as navigating the forum, private messaging, and searching. One great tip is using the quote (") button when replying to a post. Using the button will automatically alert the member of your response.

You can do some searching on other members’ experiences in Our Stories.

You’ve come to the right place to learn more and get support. I’m glad you joined and please reach out anytime.

Kindly,
Holly
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Re: Modifiable risks and APOE 4/4

Post by NF52 »

Smithb wrote: Sat Feb 17, 2024 3:15 pm Im APOE 4/4 and 23andMe said having a 4/4 gives you a 28% chance of contracting it by 75, 50% by 85.

Does following the practices Dr. Attia promotes decrease the risk to normal level? Assuming the majority of those with the 3/4 and 4/4 that get AD did not take any preventable measures such as exercise or proper diet.

I also have no family history of AD all the way to my grandfathers grandparents, will that further reduce my chances?
Hi Smithb!

It can be a bit of a shock to have no family history and have 23&me tell you that you have some very specific odds of getting Alzheimer's by the age of 75 or 85, especially if you're in your 20's or 30's, which you may be. What 23& me is actually saying is that for people diagnosed within about the last 20 years, whose medical records are available to researchers, about 50% of those with ApoE 4/4 had a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment or some form of dementia by the age of 85: which also was the average lifespan for their generation. That says little about your generation, especially since research also shows that the prevalence (how many people in population get diagnosed now) is going down significantly in the last 20 years. [The total numbers are going up, because there are a whole lot of us Baby Boomers--but we're still living longer and healthier than our parents]

Take it from me, a 71 year old woman with ApoE 4/4 who is doing just fine on cognitive testing, which I take every 3 months as a participant in a clinical trial, and in everyday life, where I can plan trips, do taxes, and enjoy grandchildren without any cognitive impairments I wasn't born with (like a lack of musical or artistic skill). I know that my three adult children with ApoE 3/4 will have a much easier time getting to 85 with their great brains than their grandparents did.

Holly has given you some great resources, especially the Primer, which goes into some detail about the things you can do for the next decades that your brain will thank you for when you are 85.

Here's some more thoughts:
The majority of people with ApoE 3/4 and 4/4 that have been diagnosed with Alzheimer's or vascular dementia, or Parkinson's or heart disease who are currently 65 and older, or previous generations DID take preventive measures. They often exercised throughout their lives--maybe not in a gym, but in their occupations and their hobbies. Before the advent of Whole Foods and Trader Joes, women (and to a lesser extent men) often cooked home-made foods and ate locally sourced fruits, vegetables and meats. I personally know one women and two men with Ph.Ds who are living full lives and advocating for others who like them, have Mild Cognitive Impairment or mild-stage Alzheimer's. They led active, healthy lives but without tools that are only now being developed to recognize or treat their genetic risk. Please don't unintentionally add to the stigma of Alzheimer's by assuming these people brought it upon themselves.

What both doctors and patients in the past didn't have was the recognition of the role of cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, inflammation, effects of air and water pollution, and for many, access to protective levels of education and health care. We can now advocate so much earlier and better and act on this information!

So the good news is that you have ALL of that, with Peter Attia and other resources at your fingertips. You also have the ability to look back at those grandfathers and ask yourself or your parents what they did experience in their lives that may have protected them, from not smoking or having excessive alcohol use, to not getting head injuries, to having lives that involved being around and supporting others. Don't forget your grandmothers' history, since you have approximately 25% of your DNA from all 4 of your grandparents.

If you discover that some of them died in their 50's to 80's from cancers that are now preventable or treatable, like colon, prostate or breast cancers, you can take charge and get early and regular screenings for that. My own adult kids are eligible for colon cancer screening in the early 40's for that reason.

If you learn that some of them died from heart attacks or strokes, then you have a clue that may be related to ApoE4, since that is linked to heart disease, possibly more if you also have high LDL-cholesterol or high Lp(a), or high C-reactive protein. "What's good for the heart is good for the brain" is advice I've heard from several brain researchers. I know people who have had a preventive cardiology visit based on their family history, in the same way that they might check in with a dermatologist to make sure they don't have a skin cancer lurking unnoticed.

Finally, you have the expanding understanding of the many ways early detection may help identify people who will need more than Dr. Atttia's recommendations, possible through eventual drugs that are safe, clinically effective and shown to work well in ApoE 4 carriers. So plan to live a life with purpose and keep an eye out for new findings showing up on Dr. Atttia's podcasts and elsewhere. This will get better--you're going to be glad you knew this at your age!

Nancy
4/4 and still an optimist!
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TheresaB
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Re: Modifiable risks and APOE 4/4

Post by TheresaB »

Smithb wrote: Sat Feb 17, 2024 3:15 pm Does following the practices Dr. Attia promotes decrease the risk to normal level? Assuming the majority of those with the 3/4 and 4/4 that get AD did not take any preventable measures such as exercise or proper diet.
I'm not familiar with Dr Attia's ApoE4 protocol, I do know I appreciate most of what he advocates, and he has a very interesting podcast with someone I am a fan of, preventative neurologist, Dr Kellyann Niotis Dr Kellyan Niotis, #236 ‒ Neurodegenerative disease: pathology, screening, and prevention |

If you visit our ApoE4.info wiki, specifically the article, Introduction to APOE4 you can read more about risks for ApoE4s, how it is not a deterministic gene, and how lifestyle choices are very important for us.

Here are some additional references from our ApoE4.info Facebook page
:
How exactly does a healthy lifestyle help prevent dementia?
• The best way to promote long-term cognitive health is by living a healthy lifestyle, according to a new study.
• The study, which examined, post mortem, brains of people up to the age of 90, found that most cases of dementia were linked to unhealthy lifestyles.
• Only 12% of cases were associated with amyloid plaques, long considered a cause of Alzheimer’s disease.
The surprising power of lifestyle in fighting dementia

And because Apoe4s tend to get Late Onset Alzheimer's Disease at an earlier age than noncarriers:
Uncovering the Hidden Risks of Young-Onset Dementia
Key Facts:
1. The study identifies 15 risk factors for young-onset dementia, similar to those for late-onset dementia.
2. Lower education, socioeconomic status, genetic variation, lifestyle factors, and health issues significantly elevate risk.
3. The findings open avenues for targeted interventions and reducing the incidence of young-onset dementia.
-Theresa
ApoE 4/4
Fiver
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Re: Modifiable risks and APOE 4/4

Post by Fiver »

It can be frustrating. It's hard to know for sure what modifiable risk factors to focus on since there isn't an easy way to check our progress and revise our approach. Following the general guidelines arising from research trials is the best approach we have right now. Luckily for us most of the interventions that seem to lower the risk of LOAD also keep us healthier in general. But this may be changing if reliable blood tests become available. Imagine being able to check your status like we check cholesterol levels now. That would be a game changer! And it seems like a reasonable thing to expect in the next 5-10 years.
aphorist
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Re: Modifiable risks and APOE 4/4

Post by aphorist »

I'd be careful of Attia's general guidance for health and then applying it to a E4/4. He seems to advocate a higher protein intake, that could be problematic for some people without some kind of fasting regimen or intermittent restriction.
Maria4/4
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Re: Modifiable risks and APOE 4/4

Post by Maria4/4 »

Smithb wrote: Sat Feb 17, 2024 3:15 pm Im APOE 4/4 and 23andMe said having a 4/4 gives you a 28% chance of contracting it by 75, 50% by 85.

Does following the practices Dr. Attia promotes decrease the risk to normal level? Assuming the majority of those with the 3/4 and 4/4 that get AD did not take any preventable measures such as exercise or proper diet.

I also have no family history of AD all the way to my grandfathers grandparents, will that further reduce my chances?
Hi Smithb,

I like Peter Attia, but he gives general/conventional advice. I prefer to follow two doctors that also are APOE4 and share sometimes specific tips / discoveries: dr Mark Hyman [youtube]https://www.youtube.com/results?search_ ... mark+hyman[/youtube] and dr Rhonda Patrick [youtube]https://www.youtube.com/results?search_ ... da+patrick[/youtube].

You can also use the APOE4 chat gpt that was created by a contributor of this forum @AussieinLA. I use it on a regular basis and it is amazing!
AussieinLA wrote: Wed Dec 06, 2023 7:04 pm Hi all: I only recently joined and starting reading up on this forum (so helpful, especially the long and comprehensive onboarding guide!).

I've been playing with chatGPT a bit lately, and I built a simple GPT agent that will reference scientific research and content on this forum to answer questions.

Here's the bot (would love feedback if you try it to improve it):
https://chat.openai.com/g/g-xNpx2i07C-apoe4-gpt

I've tried to make it an easy way to ask questions and get conversational feedback linked to scientific research and great stuff on this forum.

The guide for the bot:

As APOe4 GPT, my role is to provide comprehensive, accurate information on the APOe4 gene. I am specialized in conveying complex scientific studies in an easily understandable manner, always citing sources for verification. Additionally, I integrate insights from the apoe4.info forums, blending these with my vast access to other knowledge sources. My responses are well-informed, clear, and tailored to enhance understanding of APOe4-related topics. When answering, I will reference at least three distinct sources, including scientific studies, forum discussions, and my broad knowledge database.
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Tincup
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Re: Modifiable risks and APOE 4/4

Post by Tincup »

Maria4/4 wrote: Mon Feb 26, 2024 4:52 am You can also use the APOE4 chat gpt that was created by a contributor of this forum @AussieinLA. I use it on a regular basis and it is amazing!
This is a great tool that I use as well, but does require a subscription to ChatGPT4 ($20US/month).
Tincup
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