Let's solve ALZ. APOE4--Nature's/God's Original Design

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NF52
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Re: Let's solve ALZ. APOE4--Nature's/God's Original Design

Post by NF52 »

AnnieV wrote: Thu May 02, 2024 9:12 am Let's examine something I found puzzling. I have found a unifying reason, explanation for this difference but wonder what other analytical minds' research can offer to explain this. Below (in center) is an image of the 4 Scandinavian countries and the 3 Baltic countries. On either side of the image is the world rank of each country of ALZ death rates per 1000 (per website: https://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/cau ... alzheime[b][/b]rs-dementia/by-country/). Question: Why are all 4 Scandinavian countries in the top 12 countries of the world's highest ALZ death rates while all 3 Baltic countries are near the bottom of the list, as much as 10x fewer ALZ deaths per 1000? Statistically this appears very odd especially considering these 7 countries have, very generally speaking, at least five common factors such as (1) genetic APOE4 predispositions, (2) climate, (3) culture, (4) diets, (5) vitamin D exposure. What could account for the massive difference of one set of nations compared to another set of nations, separated only by the Baltic Sea?Scand-Baltic Comparison.JPG
I'm not sure that the Eastern Baltic regions can be seen as mostly comparable to the Scandinavian countries in culture or diet, or in diagnosis of Alzheimer's. Here's a key sentence from a 2022 study of The Costs of Dementia in Europe: An Updated Review and Meta-analysis

The Baltic and Eastern European countries are grouped together and spend the lowest amount on AD care, less than 50% of the Nordic countries. Lack of care often implies lack of access to diagnosis, or cultural resistance to diagnosis.
The Baltic countries were grouped with Eastern Europe, as levels of Gross Domestic Product (GPD) and care spending are closer than with Northern Europe (Table 1)....Based on 113 studies from 17 European countries, the estimated mean costs for all patients by region were highest in the British Isles (73,712 EUR), followed by the Nordics (43,767 EUR), Southern (35,866 EUR), Western (38,249 EUR), and Eastern Europe and Baltics (7938 EUR)...Eastern Europe and the Baltics have comparatively fewer institutional care studies and only a handful of studies report costs.
Here's more evidence of Baltic countries actually having high risk factors for Alzheimer's and vascular dementia:
Gender differences in hypertension prevalence are closely paralleled by socioeconomic inequalities. An overall increased risk of hypertension among low SES [social-economic status] individuals is confirmed, irrespective of whether one uses income, occupational, or educational achievement, with more robust associations for women (Leng, Jin, Li, Chen, & Jin, 2015). Recent data from Europe confirms low educational achievement in early life is strongly associated with higher rates of hypertension in all surveyed countries. On average, the proportion of individuals with low educational achievement reporting hypertension across the EU28 is 27.6%, 12 percentage points higher than the share reported among higher educated groups. Confirming previous results (Von dem Knesebeck, Verde, & Dragano, 2006), large variations in the level of educational inequalities in health are apparent between European countries, ranging from 5 pp [percentage points] between the highest and lowest education groups in Norway to 20 pp in Lithuania. While the determinants of these differences are not fully understood, cultural, political, and contextual factors are known to contribute to the patterning and magnitude of social inequalities in health

Here are two graphs that illustrate the sharp differences in blood pressure by gender and country and by education level and country:
% of population reporting high BP by education level.jpeg


Chapter 12 - Gender and socioeconomic differences in modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia throughout the life course

And sadly, it's also possible that the Baltic countries experience a loss of people who don't live long enough to develop Alzheimer's, which in epidemiology is called "survivor bias". [As an example outside of AD, if we looked for people who had smoked cigarettes for decades and were still living at age 85, we might say "Smoking doesn;t lead to early mortality." But we would have neglected to look at the effects of smoking long-term on a birth cohort all born in 1940, for example.]

Here's the a study by researchers in Latvia said about the health of their citizens over age 50 in 2021:
According to the WHO, healthy ageing is characterized by such interrelated determinants as intrinsic capacity, functional ability and environment. An individual's intrinsic capacity is a powerful predictor of the future ageing process and includes 5 areas - cognitive, psychological, sensory, locomotion and vitality. Exploration of these areas can provide necessary information for therapeutic and preventive actions that can be tailored to an individual's needs, priorities and values to support participation and quality of life. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare healthy ageing determinants of older individuals in the Baltic States. The research was based on the sample of older individuals (50 years and older) from wave 8 of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) during the period from November 2019 to March 2020. The obtained results indicate a low level/poor results in such determinants as locomotion, sensory, vitality and functional ability (more than 50% of the respondents among the Baltic countries has poor health, various long-term illnesses, limitations in daily activities, suffer from moderate or severe pain, requires help to meet daily needs, etc.), has various behavioral risks, however has higher assessment of cognitive and psychological determinants.
EXPLORATION OF HEALTHY AGEING DETERMINANTS IN BALTIC STATES
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Re: Let's solve ALZ. APOE4--Nature's/God's Original Design

Post by AnnieV »

What specifically explains the massive difference, to a 10x (ten fold) Finland to Estonia delta?
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Re: Let's solve ALZ. APOE4--Nature's/God's Original Design

Post by AnnieV »

Armenia and Georgia share a common border, similar climates, cultures, diets, etc. Each country's life expectancy is the same. Why is there a 20x ALZ death rate difference between these 2 countries along a common border?

HINT: The answer is the same common factor that hypothetically accounts for the Scandinavian country compared to Baltic country ALZ death rates.
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Re: Let's solve ALZ. APOE4--Nature's/God's Original Design

Post by AnnieV »

ALZ--Caspian Sea.pdf
Map
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Re: Let's solve ALZ. APOE4--Nature's/God's Original Design

Post by mike »

Another thing to consider - the Scandinavian countries were populated by early man much later than the rest of Europe (12,000 years ago as opposed to 45,000 years ago), so likely different genetics as well.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_hum ... rcator.svg
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Re: Let's solve ALZ. APOE4--Nature's/God's Original Design

Post by AnnieV »

(a) Genetics just cannot account for the Finnish skyrocking ALZ rates post 1980. Finland's own reporting data.
(b) Baltic countries are not significantly genetically, migratory different compared to Scandinavian countries.

There is a single unifying factor that's based on publicly available information that correlates the radical difference. It takes research to find it. Can anyone else find it?
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Re: Let's solve ALZ. APOE4--Nature's/God's Original Design

Post by mike »

AnnieV wrote: Mon May 20, 2024 10:42 am (a) Genetics just cannot account for the Finnish skyrocking ALZ rates post 1980. Finland's own reporting data.
(b) Baltic countries are not significantly genetically, migratory different compared to Scandinavian countries.
As I mentioned in my last post, there was a huge difference when these two areas were populated by early man. During that gap in time, Scandinavia was populated by Neanderthals. Neanderthals disappeared around 40,000 years ago, but before that there was interbreeding. Neanderthals came prior to ApoE3 variant. Europe was populated by modern man after carbohydrate consumption went up. My guess is ApoE4 was eliminated from this group, but it was later reintroduced through interbreeding. Farmer meets Hunter-Gatherer. Of course there are genetic differences.

Yes, our pollution and industrialized farming and poor lifestyle makes it worse, but with ApoE3 variant you have a better chance of removing the Abeta from the brain.
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